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DJ Strutt
01-01-2002, 10:22 PM
Ello, just finished my diploma in Audio Engineering at SAE.

So if anyone knows of anybody who needs an assistant, or anything remotely to do with audio engineering then please let me know. My email is djstrutt@hotmail.com if you want a CV.

Thanks :)

Gaz (Bulletnuts)
02-01-2002, 11:25 AM
where did you do your course?

was it part time?

I really want to take this seriousley and would be thankful if you could tell me a bit about the course.

DJ Strutt
02-01-2002, 11:45 AM
I done the course at SAE in Islington, it was full time, but you can do part time if you want too. http://www.sae.edu

:)

tnt
02-01-2002, 06:35 PM
Congratualtions!!

Is Fuzzy still at SAE?

DJ Strutt
02-01-2002, 06:50 PM
Yeah he is still there. Did you go?

tnt
02-01-2002, 08:44 PM
Yep, I was there about 3 years ago. I did the 3 month audio engineering course, but I was'nt too sure about doing the diploma (money problems)

I looked at doing a part time degree course at Middlesex University but they screwed up the time table a month before the course started, so I had to pull out. But I'm starting to look around now for degree course.

JJ
02-01-2002, 10:06 PM
how good are the sae courses cause i was thinking of doing one about 4 years ago but i worked in top end studios instead and watched the pro's very closely... then i took a year out and got a b tech national diploma in recording engineering, then i took a radio presenter course for a few weeks.. heh

tnt
02-01-2002, 10:27 PM
"how good are the sae courses cause i was thinking of doing one about 4 years ago but i worked in top end studios instead and watched the pro's very closely... then i took a year out and got a b tech national diploma in recording engineering, then i took a radio presenter course for a few weeks.. "

Sounds like you got a head start. On my course we did a lot of theory work during classes but most of the practical work was done outside of class time. Most of theory was spent on understanding the fundamentals of sounds (a lot of maths blah blah), how analogue mixing desks works, room acoustics etc. As for practicals, we started on tape splicing (thank god for digital) and worked our way upto recording a live band on an 24 track desk. There were a lot of subjects we covered in such a short space of time.

It was a good course and I learned a lot. But as you have done a b-tech already you may want to aim for a higher qualification. I think they still run degree courses at SAE. You may also want to check out other schools called Alchema and the Islington Music Workshop.

DJ Strutt
04-01-2002, 05:34 PM
Yeah they are really good, but there is lots and lots of theory! But there equipment is good, but when it breaks down it can be annoying cos they are slow at repairing it. I learnt a lot in my 9 months there.

JJ - need an assistant? ;)

djpassion
04-01-2002, 06:08 PM
Sounds like something I'd like to do, but I wonder if (given my day job) I'd be missing out on practical experience in my own studio - Learning how to make records when I could already be making them...

Neil aka Riplash
06-01-2002, 01:33 AM
Given the opportunity to have worked in a commercial studio environment from the off, I wouldn't have bothered with education in this area, but to both further my own knowledge and provide a stop-gap before I found my feet in the industry I did a BTEC and am now doing a BA. Its been useful, although I would say most of the knowledge I apply day in day out working from home has come from experience rather than tuition. I have learnt more from actually doing things myself, and helping out friends I have made hanging around studios. A few days in a busy working studio and you *have* to learn things or you are a spanner in the cogs (as a lot of you will have found in your work).

I still regard myself as at the bottom of the ladder as far as my career is, pretty much in the same boat as you Strutt. I work for a pittance doing DJ intros and adverts at home, when I'm not doing Uni work, and I barely find time for any of my own projects, so I'm not really doing a lot to "get my name out there". What I find though is that I meet a lot of genuinely nice people, many of whom have become good friends, and through this openings start to crop up.. I think the key to success for us in the long term is seeking out chances, however slight, hassling people who might be able to help, ringing up places you have already sent CVs to etc.. I'm fortunate enough to have my Uni course to fall back on as it were, and this is all I see it as at the end of the day, a stop-gap to enable me to live well enough until I find the right path to follow.

Gaz (Bulletnuts)
07-01-2002, 12:45 PM
strutt mate how did you pay those college fees!!!

$$$$ me!

TucKyOuRtOoLuP
14-01-2002, 03:13 PM
:diss: SAE hit me HARD with a maths lesson on my FIRST DAY (8 Jan). Im gonna have to do some serious work to understand that stuff. All i wanna do is get on the mackie D8 ;) Is the degree worth doing? Im looking at doing it next year as im doing the diploma at the minute.

Anyone still go there?


Oh yeah.......the fees :( ....I could buy a mountain of studio equiptment with the ammount it costs. Suppose the knowledge will pay off in the end.

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Take a look around, pimpin goin down

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toowizecrew
17-01-2002, 01:12 PM
All the SAE courses are good but Ive heard practical time is limited for students and they cost a $$$$ load!.... Another good course to check out especially if your under 19 is the city + guild Sound Eng course (ITS FREE). Theres 3 differant acknowledgement levels PT1,2,and 3 and you can run the course with a lot of differant timetables. Its a very good course to gain experinece and it run by some great lecturers! Its run at Westminster college. Check their website.

Failing that just find a studio with people that u can learn from!!! IT DOES HAPPEN!!!

Sen
17-01-2002, 02:59 PM
Alex, young 'un...look into that ^^^^^

Boz
09-07-2005, 05:44 PM
Just read this thread, thought I'd mention that you can do a City and Guilds in either Music Technology, Sound Engineering or Multimedia for absolutely FREE if you are unemployed!
Check this link:
http://www.imthurricane.org/

PS They have a Mackie d8b, Protools and Genelec monitoring ;-)

I've done the course and now own my own studio in Surrey, run a label and regularly give lectures on Music tech as well as doing studio setups!